After the School Finance Ruling: What Does it Mean for Texas?

Chandra Villanueva

Nearly two years after the filing of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Texas school finance system, District Court Judge John Dietz issued his final ruling. Not surprisingly, for those who follow education issues in Texas, he found the school finance system to be unconstitutional on the grounds that it is inadequate, inefficient, and […]

Taxes are an Investment in Texas

Tuesday, millions of Americans dutifully filed their federal tax returns, but very few of us contemplate the connection to essential public supports that we take for granted in our everyday lives. Contributing taxes is one of our most fundamental civic duties and allows us to work toward accomplishing our shared goals. When we pay taxes […]

Sizing Up the Texas Budget: Student Financial Aid

CPPP Leslie Helmcamp

Jordan dreamt of being the first in her family to graduate from college. But she never imagined that dream would come at a cost of more than $20,000 in student debt while working two jobs and attending school full time. Each year, more than 40,000 economically disadvantaged high school seniors enroll in Texas colleges. And […]

Why Payday & Auto Title Lending Legislation Is A Good Deal

Today CPPP sent an open letter to the Texas Senate supporting SB 1247, which would protect consumers from excessive fees totaling between $260 and $440 million over the upcoming biennium. Here’s why we are for SB 1247:     Half a loaf is better than none, particularly a $400 million loaf. SB 1247 limits the […]

2013 Lege–Constitutional Limit on Spending

Dick Lavine, Senior Fiscal Analyst at the Center for Public Policy Priorities

Should the legislators you elect be trusted to decide how large the state budget should be, or should a rigid limit be written into the Texas Constitution so that future budgets are locked into a formula set in stone? Texas currently has a constitutional provision that caps growth in spending from certain taxes at the […]

2013 Lege–Mental Health

Katharine Ligon

This is the first legislative session the Center will have a dedicated staff member to focus on issues related to behavioral health.  In this position I will research, analyze and advocate for policies and fiscal matters that enhance the quality and capacity of mental health and substance abuse services and treatment in Texas. There will […]

2013 Lege–Universal School Breakfast

Last school year Texas’ school cafeterias served an astonishing 300 million breakfasts.  But remarkably, that only covered 60 percent of the students who received free or reduced price lunches during the same year. This means that nearly one million of Texas’ low-income children who qualify for breakfast are not receiving it each day. The School […]

2013 Lege–Payday & Auto Title Lending

Two years ago, the 2011 Texas Legislature enacted two measures to rein in the Wild West of payday and auto title lending by requiring licensing, standard disclosures, and data collection under the Office of Consumer Credit Commissioner. The bill to address the cycle of debt—where consumers “roll over” or refinance a single loan multiple times […]

How We Work for a Better Texas

Working for a Better Texas

Health Care Protecting and improving Texas Medicaid and CHIP will help ensure access to a decent standard of health care for millions of low-income Texas seniors, children, and families who can’t afford private insurance. Accepting the Affordable Care Act’s opportunity to cover more than a million uninsured Texas adults in Medicaid will bring billions back […]

The Budget Puzzle–Part Four

Almost 1.5 million students were enrolled in credit courses at a Texas college or university in Fall 2011—more than 9 out of 10 of them at a public institution. Public community and other two-year colleges alone enroll more than half of all students in the state. Higher education funding, including financial aid, is 15 percent […]