Initial Budget Proposals Include Cuts We Can’t Afford

Eva DeLuna Castro

Today, we learned a little about what the House and Senate budget proposals included, as well as what the Legislative Budget Board estimates is necessary to cover 2014-15 growth.

We spent some time at the Capitol today doing preliminary analysis and comparing what each chamber is proposing to spend to what is needed to fund growth for 2014-15, with the 2011 cuts continued:

Microsoft Word - Charts for Blog Post.docx Microsoft Word - Charts for Blog Post.docx

And another way to look at it:


HB 1 SB 1 ver2

Both budget proposals for 2014-15 include cuts to the barebones budget passed in 2011. That means cuts to schools that have already laid off teachers and increased classroom sizes, cuts to health care when fewer doctors are accepting Medicaid patients, and retaining the 2011 cuts to college student financial aid.

Rather than take the opportunity to undo 2011 cuts, both chambers also left over $6 billion in General Revenue unspent, and all $11.8 billion of the Rainy Day Fund untouched.

It’s important to note, though, that these budget proposals are just a starting point. Over the next several months, the Legislature will hold hearings, votes, and debates that will end in a 2014-15 budget. Based on what we learned today, there is room for A LOT of improvement to the budget.

As the budget process continue, we’ll keep you updated on each proposal and what they mean for you, and for Texas.

 

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